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Journal of Health and Social Sciences 2022, 7(2) Click Free Full Open Access – CURRENT ISSUE

15 June 2022

Table of Contents

JHSS 2022,7(2):132-136

Editorial in Occupational and Public Health

Post-COVID-19 Syndrome and new challenges posed by climate change require an interdisciplinary approach: The role of occupational health services

Authors: Francesco CHIRICO1Behdin NOWROUZI-KIA2

1 Post-Graduate School of Occupational Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. Health Service Department, Italian State Police, Ministry of the Interior, Milan, Italy.  E-mail: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it ORCID: 0000-0002-8737-4368.
2 Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada E-mail: behdin.nowrouzi.kia@utoronto.ca ORCID: 0000- 0000-0002-5586-4282  

Keywords: COVID-19; long-COVID-19; occupational therapy; occupational health; occupational health services; post-COVID-19 symptoms.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):137-140

Technical Viewpoint in Medical Education

Tortured phrases dilute the specificity of medical jargon

Author: Jaime A. TEIXEIRA da SILVA1*

Independent researcher, Ikenobe 3011-2, Kagawa-ken, 761-0799, Japan. E-mail: jaimetex@yahoo.com

Abstract

The effectiveness of technical communication among medical peers is, to a great extent, determined by the accuracy of the jargon that is used, so as to avoid errors in interpretations or ambiguity in the message. “Tortured phrases”, a fairly new phenomenon, employ ambiguous language to provide odd or synonymous meanings that substitute for established jargon or standard English phrases. This technical viewpoint highlights this risk using several examples from the recent medical literature. This might represent a strategy to avoid the detection of plagiarism, it might reflect a poor command of English grammar, or it might reflect the use of a third-party service during the development of the paper. Much wider debate is still needed, as is the discovery of more examples to appreciate if there are trends underlying this phenomenon, and to what extent they may be distorting the medical literature.

Keywords: Editorial oversight; ethics; failed peer review; medical education; nonsense text; status quo testing.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):141-151

Review Article in Infection Diseases

Evolution of SARS-CoV-2 variants: A rapid literature scan

Authors: Kavita BATRA1-3*, Joseph Effah-ACHEAMPONG3,4, Ravi BATRA5,6, Madison LOPEY3,4, Po-Ju WU3, Suraj ARORA7, Priyanka SALUJA8, Logan GALLAWAY3,4, Gabriella NUCERA9, Lukasz SZARPAK10,11, Michal PRUC12, Anne WEISMAN1, Murat YILDIRIM13, Manoj SHARMA5

1Department of Medical Education, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: Kavita.batra@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-0722-0191; Email: anne.weisman@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-5121-0177
2Office of Research, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States of America.
3Office of Analytics, Nevada Department of Health and Human Services, Carson City, Nevada, United States of America, Email: eacheampong@health.nv.gov, ORCID: 0000-0001-5896-4599; mlopey@dhhs.nv.gov, ORCID: 0000-0001-9225-606X; pwu@dhhs.nv.gov; lgallaway@dhhs.nv.gov. ORCID: 0000-0002-1313-2884
4CDC Foundation, Atlanta, United States of America
5Department of Social and Behavioral Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: manoj.sharma@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-4624-2414
6Department of Information Technology, Coforge Ltd., Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, Email: ravi.batra123@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0002-7335-3582
7Department of Restorative Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia, Email: sprakash@kku.edu.sa. ORCID: 0000-0002-1963-8931
8Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, JCD Denta
9Emergency Department, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, ASST Fate
benefratelli and Sacco, Milano, Italy, Email:
gabriellanucera@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0003-1425-0046
10Institute of Outcomes Research, Maria Sklodowska – Curie Medical Academy, Warsaw, Poland, Email: lukasz.szarpak@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0002-0973-5455
11Henry JN Taub Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
12Research Unit, Polish Society of Disaster Medicine, Warsaw, Poland, Email: m.pruc@ptmk.org. ORCID: 0000-0002-2140-9732
13Department of Psychology, Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri, Turkey, Email: muratyildirim@agri.edu.tr. ORCID: 0000-0003-1089-1380

*Corresponding Author:
Assistant Professor and Medical Research Biostatistician, Kavita Batra, 2040 West Charleston Blvd, Las Vegas. Nevada. USA, Email: Kavita.batra@unlv.edu

Abstract

Emerging Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-Cov-2) variants continue to be a threat to tackling the pandemic and a challenge to scientists as they continue to find solutions to the evolving complexities of the pandemic. This rapid literature scan aims to synthesize evidence related to the existence of the new variants, their epidemiology, and data related to vaccine efficacy. Previous variants, such as Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Omicron were identified as “Variants of Concern” (VOCs), whereas Lambda and Mu were classified as “Variants of Interest” (VOIs).  The risk of hospitalization largely differs among all these variants and the research landscape is still evolving. According to the collective evidence, Gamma variant had the highest hospitalization risk (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR 3.20, 95% CI: 2.40 to 4.26) followed by Beta (aHR 2.85, 95% CI: 1.56 to 5.23), Delta (aHR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.56 to 3.34), Alpha (aHR 1.64, 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.07), and Omicron (aHR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.52) as compared to the original Wuhan strain. It was also found that vaccination decreased the risk of hospitalization following infections with more virulent strains, such as Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta. The risk of hospitalization was the lowest following Omicron infection among vaccinated individuals. Deltacron, a new hybrid strain (AY.4/BA.1) is believed to result from the previous co-circulation of SARS-CoV-2 Delta and Omicron during November 2021-February 2022. This hybrid virus may have been formed in the body of a person who was exposed to both viruses at the same time. Existing evidence suggested no change in epidemiology and severity of infections resulting from this hybrid strain. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to be insidious and treacherous in every form and variant. Vaccination offers a pragmatic solution to fight against the pandemic and in reducing the risk of hospitalizations. Further research and epidemiological surveillance will be needed to determine the evolving complexities of the variants and the pandemic, especially as the pandemic changes its course towards endemicity. The development of efficacious therapeutic interventions and increased vaccine uptake could reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the SARS-CoV-2 variants.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; Omicron; Hybrid strain; COVID-19 pandemic; Variant of Interest; Variant of Concern; Delta; Alpha; Beta; Lambda; Mu; Genomic surveillance; Genomic Epidemiology.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):152-180

Systematic Review in Occupational Health Psychology

Animal-Assisted Interventions and Post-traumatic Stress Disorders in military and veterans: A systematic review of the literature

Authors: Francesco CHIRICO1, Ilaria CAPITANELLI2, Behdin Nowrouzi-Kia3, Aaron HOWE4, Kavita BATRA5, Manoj SHARMA6, Lukasz SZARPAK7, Michal PRUC8,, Gabriella NUCERA9, Giuseppe FERRARI10, Claudio Giovanni CORTESE11, Maria Michela GIANINO12, Daniela ACQUADRO-MARAN13

1 Post-Graduate School of Occupational Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. Health Service Department, Italian State Police, Ministry of the Interior, Milan, Italy. E-mail: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it. ORCID:0000-0002-8737-4368
2 Prevention Service in the Workplace (SPRESAL), Local Health Unit Roma 4, Civitavecchia, Italy. E-mail: ilaria.capitanelli@yahoo.it. ORCID: 0000-0002-9199-1705
3 Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Canada. E-mail: behdin.nowrouzi.kia@utoronto.ca. ORCID: 0000-0002-5586-428
4 Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Canada University of Toronto, Canada. ORCID: 0000-0003-3610-8614
5Department of Medical Education, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: Kavita.batra@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-0722-0191. Office of Research, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States of America
6Department of Social and Behavioral Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: manoj.sharma@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-4624-2414
5Institute of Outcomes Research, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Medical Academy, Warsaw, Poland. Maria Sklodowska-Curie Bialystok Oncology Center, Bialystok, Poland. Henry JN Taub Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Houston, TX, United States. E-mail: lukasz.szarpak@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0002-0973-5455
8Research Unit, Polish Society of Disaster Medicine, Warsaw, Poland E-mail: m.pruc@ptmk.org ORCID: 0000-0002-2140-9732
9 Department of Emergency, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli and Sacco, Milan, Italy. E-mail: gabriellanucera@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0003-1425-0046
10SIPISS, Milan, Italy. E-mail:ferrari@sipiss.it. ORCID: 0000-0003-1244-5931
11 Department of Psychology, Università di Torino, Torino, Italy. E-mail: claudio.cortese@unito.it. ORCID: 0000-0003-2339-9838.
12Department of Public Health and Paediatrics, Università di Torino, Torino, Italy. E-mail: mariola.gianino@unito.it. ORCID: 0000-0003-4239-7475.
13 Department of Psychology, Università di Torino, Torino, Italy. E-mail: daniela.acquadro@unito.it ORCID: 0000-0002-9924-4093.

*Corresponding Author:
Adjunct Professor, Francesco Chirico, Via Umberto Cagni, 21 20162 Milan, Italy. E-mail: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it.

Abstract

Introduction: Animal-Assisted Interventions (AAIs) have been increasingly used in the workplace to mitigate the effect of work-related stress and improve psychological well-being among employees. Military workers returning home from combat and veterans face a high burden of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). This systematic review aimed to investigate the potential benefits of AAIs on military workers and veterans affected by PTSD.
Methods: A systematic review was conducted across Scopus, PubMed Central/Medline, Web of Science, and Google Scholar in December 2021 and June 2022 using predefined search criteria. All types of studies published in the English language were included except editorials, commentaries, and narrative reviews. Studied published from January 2001 to December 2021 were included. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2020 reporting guidelines for this systematic review. The assessment of study quality was carried out with a 16-item Quality Assessment Tool for Studies with Diverse Designs (QATSDD).
Results: Overall, 25 studies were finally included in this systematic review. Most of the AAIs were canine-assisted programs (n=12) and therapeutic horseback riding or equine-assisted psychotherapy (n=11). There was only one intervention study utilizing a pinnipeds-based program (n=1), while one study was based on several types of animals (n=1).
Out of 25 studies focusing on the effects of AAIs on PTSD in the military (n=3) and veterans (n=21), the majority of them (n=18) observed significantly lower PTSD symptomatology following AAIs. Three studies observed no statistically significant difference in PTSD symptomatology.
Discussion: Our findings indicated that implementing AAI programs among military workers and veterans may improve their psychological well-being and reduce the severity of PTSD symptoms. Policymakers and occupational health services should consider adopting AAIs during military service and after military discharge to support the mental health of military workers.

Keywords: Animal-assisted Interventions; military veterans; pets; occupational health; workplace.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):181-194

Viewpoint Article in Health Policy

Examining the unmet need for rehabilitation through a health policy lens: A focus on prevention, engagement and participation across the lifespan 

Author: Behdin NOWROUZI-KIA1*, Amin YAZDANI2 

1 Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ORCID: 0000-0002-5586-4282
2 Canadian Institute for Safety, Wellness & Performance, School of Business, Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. E-mail: Ayazdani@conestogac.on.ca. ORCID: 0000-0003-3479-581x.

*Corresponding Author:
Assistant Professor Behdin Nowrouzi-Kia, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. E-mail: behdin.nowrouzi.kia@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

In many jurisdictions, the capacity to provide rehabilitation is significantly restricted or non-existent and fails to address the population’s needs sufficiently. The extent and scope of unmet rehabilitation warrants an immediate and collaborative international effort and action by all stakeholders. This viewpoint article examined the promotion of equity in addressing the unmet rehabilitation needs through public policy action and the health lens that considers access to rehabilitation services as a fundamental human right. Based on the principles of access, equity, respect and human dignity, we have included four recommendations including: 1) using a multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation; 2) preventing disability and maximining functioning; 3) increasing the supply of rehabilitation professionals, and 4) engaging in meaningful activities. Furthermore, this paper provides recommendations to meet the World Health Organization’s sustainable development goals and discuss how health policy can address these goals. 

Keywords: Access, and Evaluation; disabled persons; health equity; health care quality; public policy; rehabilitation; occupational therapy.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):195-211

Original Article in Occupational Health Psychology

Prevalence and predictors of burnout syndrome among schoolteachers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy: A cross-sectional survey

Authors: Francesco CHIRICO1ǂ, Pietro CRESCENZO,2ǂ Behdin NOWROUZI-KIA3, Livio TARCHI,4 Kavita BATRA5, Giuseppe FERRARI6, Murat YILDIRIM7,Alessandra ROMANO8, Gabriella NUCERA9, Serena RIPA10, Manoj SHARMA11ǂǂ, Michael LEITER12ǂǂ

1 Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Post-Graduate Specialization, Rome, Italy. Email: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it ORCID: 0000-0002-8737-4368.
2 Faculty of Psychology, eCampus University, Novedrate, Italy. Email: pietro.crescenzo@uniecampus.it. ORCID: 0000-0001-5240-315X.
3 Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada E-mail: behdin.nowrouzi.kia@utoronto.ca ORCID: 0000- 0000-0002-5586-4282
4Psychiatry Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, FI, Italy. Email: livio.tarchi@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0002-9931-5621
5Department of Medical Education, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America. Office of Research, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States of America. Email: kavita.batra@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-0722-0191
6 SIPISS, Milan, Italy. Email: ferrari@sipiss.it. ORCID: 0000-0003-1244-5931
7Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Turkey. University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom. Email: muratyildirim@agri.edu.tr. ORCID: 0000-0003-1089-1380.
8Department of Social, Political and Cognitive Sciences, University of Siena, Italy. Email: alessandra.romano2@unisi.it. ORCID: 0000-0002-5679-8758.
9 Department of Emergency, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, ASST Fatabenefratelli and Sacco, Milan, Italy. Email: gabriellanucera@gmail.com ORCID: 0000-0003-1425-0046
10 Unobravo srl,Casalnuovo di Napoli, Neaples, Italy. Email: serena.ripa@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0003-4552-111X
11 Department of Social and Behavioral Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America. Email: manoj.sharma@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-4624-2414
12 School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia. E-mail: michael.leiter@acadiau.ca ORCID: 0000-0001-5680-0363.  

ǂ First coauthorship  ǂǂ Last coauthorship

*Corresponding Author:
Adjunct Professor Francesco Chirico, Via Umberto Cagni, 21 20162 Milan, Italy. E-mail: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it.  

Abstract

Introduction: During the COVID-19 pandemic, teleworking affected the mental well-being of nearly all strata of the population. Teachers, who were employed to teach online courses during lockdown have been psychologically distressed. The primary aim of the current study was to estimate the prevalence and differences in the Burnout Syndrome (BOS) symptomatology in the light of gender, work position, teaching role, and subject taught. As a secondary aim, differences in perceived well-being were estimated through the contribution of individual factors.
Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted from February – May 2021 to recruit a total of 361 teachers from all Italian regions. The Work-Life Balance scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and an ad-hoc questionnaire with items on perceived physical well-being and perceived impact and difficulty in remote work were utilized. Predictors associated with burnout and its subscales were examined using linear regression analyses.
Results: Burnout, measured as the co-existence of high emotional exhaustion (EE), high depersonalization (DP), and low personal accomplishment (PA) was revealed in 16.9% of teachers, while high EE, high DP, and low PA were respectively measured in 35.2%, 13.2% and 35.2% of the sample. Variables, such as gender, work position, teaching role, and subject taught were all significant for group differences in perceived well-being or BOS dimensions among teachers.
Discussion: Our findings suggest that the implementation of occupational health programs and workplace health promotion programs for improving the mental well-being of teachers. In particular, a higher caution must be needed for implementing critical institutional changes, such as the wide and rapid adoption of telecommuting.

Keywords: Burnout syndrome; mental health; teacher well-being; occupational health.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):212-223

Original Article in Public Health and Psychology

Do mindful pregnant women intend to breastfeed longer? Empirical evidence on mindfulness, well-being, and intended breastfeeding duration

Authors: Armanda NERINI1, Camilla MATERA2*, Valeria DUBINI3, Marco SANTINI4 

1 Department of Education, Languages, Intercultures, Literatures and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. Email: nerini@psico.unifi.it ORCID: 0000-0003-0045-0231.
2 Department of Education, Languages, Intercultures, Literatures and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. Email: camilla.matera@unifi.it ORCID: 0000-0002-1791-4074.
3ASL Tuscany Center, Presidio P. Palagi, Villino Tendi, Florence, Italy. E-mail: valeria.dubini@uslcentro.toscana.it ORCID: 0000-0001-9711-8221.
4 ASL Tuscany Center, Presidio P. Palagi, Villino Tendi, Florence, Italy. E-mail: marco.santini@unifi.it ORCID: 0000-0003-1785-3344.

*Corresponding Author:
Professor Camilla Matera, Department of Education, Languages, Intercultures, Literatures and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. ORCID:0000-0002-1791-4074. Email: camilla.matera@unifi.it

Abstract

Introduction: Breastfeeding plays an important role for mothers’ and child’s health. The aim of this study was to examine the association between mindfulness facets (observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, and non-reactivity), psychological well-being, and breastfeeding intention during pregnancy.
Methods: Participants were 193 pregnant women aged 21–47 years (M = 33.59) took part in a cross-sectional study by completing a questionnaire. Path analysis was performed to examine the relationships among the research variables.
Results: Path analysis showed that non-judging of thoughts and feelings, describing experiences with words, and letting feelings come and go without reacting were positively related to psychological well-being; non-judging and observing internal and external experiences were positively related to breastfeeding intention. Differently from our hypothesis, psychological well-being did not mediate the relationship between mindfulness and intended breastfeed duration.
Discussion and Conclusion: This research was the first one showing that some mindfulness abilities are significantly associated with pregnant women’s intention to breastfeed. Care providers should consider that support for breastfeeding might include strategies that focus on inviting women to adopt a non-judgmental style and increasing observing their internal and external experiences during pregnancy.

Keywords: Intended breastfeed; mindfulness facets; pregnant women; psychological well-being.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):224-235

Original Article in Psychology

Role of resilience in psychological adjustment and satisfaction with life among undergraduate students in Turkey: A cross-sectional study

Authors: Murat YILDIRIM1, Zafer Güney ÇAĞIŞ2, Kavita BATRA3,4, Giuseppe FERRARI5, Muhammed KIZILGEÇİT6, Francesco CHIRICO7†, Manoj SHARMA8†

1 Department of Psychology, Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Turkey.  ORCID: 0000-0003-1089-1380
2 Department of Psychology, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey. ORCID: 0000-0001-8795-9000
3Department of Medical Education, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: Kavita.batra@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-0722-0191
4Office of Research, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine at UNLV, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States of America.
5SIPISS, Milan, Italy. E-mail: ferrari@sipiss..it ORCID: 0000-0003-1244-5931
6Department of Psychology of Religion, Atatürk University, Turkey. ORCID: 0000-0002-8914-5681
7Post-Graduate School of Occupational Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. Health Service Department, Italian State Police, Ministry of the Interior, Milan, Italy. ORCID: 0000-0002-8737-4368
8Department of Social and Behavioral Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States of America, Email: manoj.sharma@unlv.edu. ORCID: 0000-0002-4624-2414

Last co-authorship.

*Corresponding Author:
Associate Professor Murat Yıldırım. Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science and Letters, Erzurum Yolu 4 Km 04100, Merkez, Ağrı, Turkey. E-mail: muratyildirim@agri.edu.tr; muratyildirimphd@gmail.com

Abstract

Introduction: Cultivation of resilience is shown to reduce mental health problems and improve well-being. The effect of resilience on psychological adjustment problems and satisfaction with life is however not adequately discussed. This study investigated the predictive effect of resilience in psychological adjustment and satisfaction with life among undergraduate students during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey.
Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a convenience sampling method was utilized to recruit undergraduate students from a public educational institution in Turkey. Psychometric valid tools, such as the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS), Brief Psychological Adjustment-6 (BASE-6) and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) were used to measure the primary outcomes of the study. Data were analyzed using the independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression.
Results: Of total 224 undergraduates participated in this study, nearly 74% were males and the mean age of the sample was 21.03±1.66 years. More than half of the participants had average socioeconomic status (53.57%) followed by above-average (40.18%) and below-average (6.25%). The results indicated that males and individuals who had low socioeconomic status reported greater psychological maladjustment problems. Furthermore, the resilience negatively predicted the psychological maladjustment (β = -0.31, p<0.01) and positively predicted satisfaction with life (β = 0.17, p< 0.05) after controlling for age, gender, and perceived socioeconomic status.
Discussion: These results shed light on the relationship of resilience with psychological outcomes in terms of satisfaction with life and psychological adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings of this study point to the potential role of resilience in improving satisfaction with life and psychological adjustment among undergraduate students in Turkey. Additionally, efforts by practitioners and policymakers should be made in developing resilience-building interventions to foster post-traumatic growth among students. 

Keywords: COVID-19 pandemic; psychological adjustment; resilience; satisfaction with life.

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JHSS 2022,7(2):236-248

Original Article in Health Policy

A disease of the rich and mighty: A misnomer in COVID-19 communication across the media in Nigeria

Authors: Olayinka Stephen ILESANMI1, Aanuoluwapo Adeyimika AFOLABI2*, Francesco CHIRICO3, Gabriella NUCERA4, Salvatore ZAFFINA5

1Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. E-mail: ileolasteve@yahoo.co.uk. ORCID: 0000-0003-0827-6442.
2Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. E-mail: afoannade@gmail.com. ORCID: 0000-0001-9928-2252.
3Post-Graduate School of Occupational Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. Health Service Department, Italian State Police, Ministry of the Interior, Milan, Italy. E-mail: francesco.chirico@unicatt.it. ORCID: 0000-0002-8737-4368.
4Department of Emergency, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, ASST Fatabenefratelli and Sacco, Milan, Italy. E-mail: gabriella.nucera@asst-fbf-sacco.it. ORCID: 0000-0003-1425-0046.
5Occupational Medicine/Health Technology Assessment Research Unit, Clinical-Technological Innovations Research Area, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy. E-mail: salvatore.zaffina@opbg.net. ORCID: 0000-0002-8858-5423.

*Corresponding Author:
Aanuoluwapo A. Afolabi. E-mail: afoannade@gmail.com.

Abstract

Introduction: Given the high coverage of the mass media and its significant influence in communicating evidence-based health information, the aim of this study was to describe the misnomer in COVID-19 communication across the media in Nigeria.
Methods: This was a review of newspaper articles that had been published between 1st February and 31st May 2020. Quantitative content analysis was used to describe and analyze the themes which characterized media representations of the COVID-19 outbreak in Nigeria. Identification of codes and themes was done by the researchers and were used to broadly categorize the data obtained into ‘general’ and ‘thematic’ categories. Coding for the general category included 14 news media outlets during the first three months of COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria. Codes for the thematic category included: Description of COVID-19 in Nigeria, Assurances on COVID-19 containment in Nigeria, Support for COVID-19 management, COVID-19 education, Treatment of COVID-19, and the effects of COVID-19 in Nigeria.
Results: In all, 289 news articles met the inclusion criteria and were thus analyzed. The reporting was as follows: Description of COVID-19 (18.3%), Assurances of readiness and containment (13.5%), COVID-19 education (25.3%), Support for management of Coronavirus in Nigeria (14.9%), Treatment of COVID-19 in Nigeria (13.8%), and Effects of COVID-19 (14.2%). Overall, 64 (22.1%) of COVID-19 information across the media was fake news; 35 (12.2%) pertained to the “Description of COVID-19” theme, while 29 (9.9%) pertained to the “Treatment of COVID-19” theme.
Discussion: To facilitate accurate reporting of detailed information by the news media, a collaboration between health agencies and news media outlets should be enhanced to curtail false information ravaging the society.

Keywords: Coronavirus, COVID-19, Health Information, News media, Health information, SARS-CoV-2, Nigeria.

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JHSS 2022,7(2)249-255

Case Report in Psychiatry and Public Health

Hoarding Disorder, Suicidality, and Treatment Modalities

Authors: Michael KELSON1*, Kavita BATRA2,3, Manoj SHARMA4

1 Department of Medical Sciences, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Nutley, NJ, USA. ORCID: 0000-0002-9379-5046
2 Department of Medical Education, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA. E-mail: kavita.batra@unlv.edu ORCID: 0000-0002-0722-0191.
3 Office of Research, Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA.
4 Department of Social & Behavioral Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA. E-mail: manoj.sharma@unlv.edu ORCID: 0000-0002-4624-2414.

*Corresponding Author:
Michael Kelson, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, 123 Metro Boulevard, Nutley, NJ 07110. Email: michael.kelson@hmhn.org.

Abstract

Hoarding Disorder is a syndrome marked by persistent difficulty in discarding items due to a perceived need to save the objects, regardless of value or worth. Consequently, a large number of items accumulate in residential spaces, which leads to significant distress with impaired social/occupational functioning. This diagnosis is commonly seen in association with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder and has recently achieved recognition as a standalone diagnosis. Response to treatment among patients with hoarding disorder is variable, with some individuals experiencing associated suicidality. This case report details a 77-year-old female with a history of major depressive disorder, who was found to have hoarding symptoms at the time of hospital admission. The patient was provided with cognitive behavioral therapy and numerous psychotropic agents were added to the treatment plan. Over the course of 8-weeks of psychopharmacological management, the patient showed minimal improvement of symptomatology, with a PHQ-9 score change from 27 to 24. The purpose of this case report is to recognize the lack of sufficient evidence for appropriate pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic management for patients with hoarding disorder. Most of the scientific literature on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in hoarding disorder was conducted in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with a prominent hoarding component. Also, most of the studies analyzing the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in hoarding disorder demonstrated varying benefit. Moreover, our goal in this report is to increase the awareness of hoarding disorder as a potential cause of suicidality.

Keywords: hoarding disorder; compulsive hoarding; suicide; pharmacotherapy; cognitive behavioral therapy

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